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February 2008

Socialist legacy: aversion to equality?

A new paper titled, Attitudes to equality: the "socialist legacy" revisited, analyzes whether residents of post-socialist countries have "a preference for greater income equality, other things being equal, owing to the legacy of socialism." Surprisingly or not, the authors find little evidence that supports this claim.

Burgeoning carbon offset industry in East Asia

Michael Figueroa's picture
Photo via Shutterstock​Marine Protected Areas will be a topic for discussion at the IUCN World Parks Congress, which is opening today in Sydney.  And it should be: MPAs—which are marine spaces that restrict human activity and manage resources to achieve long-term conservation of nature—are one of the many tools for better ocean management.  This is one of the reasons the World Bank Group supports efforts to establish MPAs in countries including Indonesia and Brazil.

Every MPA is not created the same; some allow fishing and some do not, some are small and some are large, some are connected and some stand alone. When they are well planned and well executed, MPAs can help feed communities, protect jobs and boost biodiversity in the ocean. Here are the top five reasons why MPAs can be GREAT!

1. Spill Over Effects

The benefits of an MPA extend far beyond the boundaries of protection. When well planned, MPAs act as the home base for migratory species. These species use the protected area to reproduce, feed or congregate. But they do not stick around for long. This is called the “spill over effect” and it is hugely beneficial to local fishing communities. Even if fishing is restricted inside the MPA, just outside the border the fish are more numerous and far larger. For example, in Indonesia, community income increased 21 percent in 258 villages near a network of six protected areas.

Negotiations are Political Acts; Peace is a Mind-Set

Henriette von Kaltenborn-Stachau's picture


Today is “End Poverty Day.” This is an important marker in the fight to end extreme poverty by 2030—a time for us to renew our collective commitment to do more and better to end poverty, and reflect on what the global community has accomplished together.
 
Since 1960, the International Development Association, IDA, has stood at the frontlines of our work in the poorest countries. IDA investments help spur greater stability and progress around the world by preventing conflict and violence, generating private sector investment, creating jobs and economic growth, preventing the worst effects of climate change, and promoting gender equality and good governance.
 
With IDA’s help, hundreds of millions of people have escaped poverty—through the creation of jobs, access to schools, health facilities, social safety nets, roads, electricity, and more. Our most recent results show quite simply that IDA works. For example, from 2011-17, IDA helped more than 600 million people receive essential health services, 30 million pregnant women receive prenatal care from a health provider, recruit 8 million teachers, and immunize a quarter of a billion children.

Should there be common standards for Sovereign Wealth Funds in Asia?

James Seward's picture

Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs), government owned investment vehicles typically funded by foreign exchange surpluses or natural resource revenues seem to be in the news about everyday.  Their massive size, rapid growth, and high-profile investments in the U.S.


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