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How Maputo is driving new forms of collaboration between citizens and city governments

Eva Clemente's picture
During the Ninth Session of the World Urban Forum (WUF9) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the World Bank delegation met with Maimunah Mohd Sharif, Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlements Program (UN-Habitat).

Ms. Sharif became the Executive UN-Habitat in December 2017, succeeding Joan Clos of Spain. She was previously Mayor of the City Council of Penang Island, Malaysia, where she led the Municipal Council of Seberang Perai to achieve its vision of a “cleaner, greener, safer and healthier place to work, live, invest and play.”

In 2011, Ms. Sharif was the first woman to be appointed president of the Municipal Council of Seberang Perai, where she collaborated with the World Bank on urban development projects.

Under Ms. Sharif’s leadership, UN-Habitat has focused WUF9’s theme on “Cities 2030, Cities for all: Implementing the New Urban Agenda” as a tool and accelerator for achieving Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Watch a video blog of UN-Habitat Executive Director Maimunah Mohd Sharif (@MaimunahSharif) and World Bank Director Sameh Wahba (@SamehNWahba) where they discuss the importance of collaboration and partnership for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.
 
 




 

Does superior information make us more discerning? What Uber drivers can teach us about learning and rationality

Roxanne Bauer's picture

In 1957, Herbert A. Simon (Nobel Prize in economics 1978) introduced the concept of bounded rationality that recognizes that in decision making, human rationality is limited by the information we have, our own cognitive biases, our training and experience, and the finite amount of time we have to make a decision. Individuals and firms do the best they can with the information they have, and since they don’t have time to evaluate and rationally pick the optimal solution, they simplify their choices and go with one that is satisfactory rather than rationally optimal—this is called stastificing.

Behavioral economics accounts for this by attempting to incorporate psychological insights. While most economists agree that there are some limits to the reasoning capabilities of individuals and firms, there has been much discussion about where and how to account for bounded rationality.  On the spectrum between perfect rationality and the total absence of it, where are humans?

To explore this question, let’s take a look at cabdrivers and Uber drivers.

Delivering universal health coverage – will smart phone apps replace bureaucrats?

Andreas Seiter's picture

The simple answer is yes. Now, let’s discuss in more depth why gender equality is a key ally in the prevention of violent conflict.

Gender equality is an essential factor in a country’s security and stability. Excluding women from actively participating in society can increase the risk of instability. Gender equality is not only about doing what is right or about social justice; it is also an important element in economic development and a critical predictor of stability and security, which can inform and improve work on conflict prevention.

Devel-APP-ment - The Top 5 Lessons from the App Industry

Tanya Gupta's picture

The big 5 multilateral development banks(MDBs) (World Bank Group, African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and Inter-American Development Bank) collectively provided close to $100 billion in concessional and non-concessional lending in 2012 or FY13. Of late, their size, traditionally an advantage, has become something of a disadvantage. The MDBs are facing intense challenges in at least three major ways. One - criticism from academics, developing nations and others that foreign aid is detrimental for a country’s growth. Two - technology has diluted the monopolistic advantages they had (knowledge, networks, access to funding) and is leading to new models of development.  As echoed by World Bank President Jim Kim, there is a "need for alignment" for development institutions in "a rapidly changing world."  Three - more and more countries are shifting from demanding traditional loans to demanding knowledge and knowledge products, and development institutions are only now starting to respond to this challenge.

Media (R)evolutions: What is the Economic Impact of Geo Services?

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

In our everyday lives, geospatial science and technology services, such as digital mapping, GPS, and other location-based services, are changing the way we operate. These services help us navigate the world, saving time, facilitating our entertainment needs and widening the breadth of markets. These technologies also generate huge amounts of economic activity in the form of research and development, programming and cost savings.

A recent study by economic consultancy firm Oxera, on behalf of Google, illustrates how big the industry has become. Internationally, the firm states, the geo services industry is valued between $150-$270 billion per year and pays around $90 billion in wages.



 

Development Results at Your Fingertips

Sarah Holmberg's picture

América Latina, en la encrucijada de la política monetaria/ Banco Mundial 


Cuando asumí el cargo de Economista Jefe para Latinoamérica y el Caribe en el Banco Mundial hace casi un año, una de las tareas que me propuse fue que los estudios de alta calidad que se preparan en mi oficina (soy muy afortunado de contar con un excelente equipo de investigadores) lleguen a la mayor audiencia posible.  Para mí, como economista, es fácil intercambiar puntos de vista con mis colegas o amigos de la academia. ¿Pero qué pasa con el resto de la gente?  Después de todo, nuestro principal propósito es compartir con todo el público -y no sólo economistas- qué está pasando en nuestra región, cuáles son los principales problemas que enfrentamos, y qué debemos hacer para seguir creciendo en forma inclusiva y continuar reduciendo la pobreza y desigualdad social.