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2017 in review: The top ten World Bank education blogs

Anne Elicaño-Shields's picture
Celebrating education. (Photo: World Bank)


As the editor of the World Bank’s education blog, I get weekly submissions from our education experts from all corners of the globe. Provocative and informative, our bloggers write about some of the education sector’s most hotly debated issues today.

Here are 2017’s most-read blog posts:

#10 There are cost-effective ways to train teachers

Teachers are the single most important factor affecting how much students learn. However, talent and heart aren’t enough to make a good teacher- as in all professions, one must train (and continue to train!) to be truly effective. This can be a big challenge in countries with fewer resources for education. Read about how 8,000 teachers in disadvantaged districts in Ghana upgraded their skills while simultaneously teaching in schools.

What 15 seconds can tell you about a classroom

Daphna Berman's picture


Carbon pricing was the center of discussion as Carbon Expo got underway in Barcelona on May 26. World Bank Group Vice President and Special Envoy for Climate Change Rachel Kyte was asked by RTCC about the changing views toward carbon pricing as a policy tool in the fight against climate change and how business leaders responded to carbon pricing during Climate Week Paris the previous week.

Thailand’s small school challenge and options for quality education

Dilaka Lathapipat's picture

También disponible en: English

El
Proyecto de Divulgación de la Educación Intergeneracional para las Personas Sordas (IDEO), implementado entre 2011 y 2015 en las ciudades de Hanoi, Thai Nguyen, Quang Binh y Ho Chi Minh en Viet Nam, ha ayudado a preparar a 255 niños sordos menores de 6 años para la educación formal a través de la enseñanza del lenguaje de señas. Mediante el uso de un enfoque innovador, el proyecto creó "equipos de apoyo a las familias", integrados por un mentor sordo, un intérprete de este tipo de lenguaje y un maestro con audición normal, para enseñar la lengua de señas a los niños y sus familias en sus hogares. Sigamos el “viaje” de dos madres que apoyan a sus hijos sordos en el aprendizaje del lenguaje de señas. 

El lenguaje de señas es la lengua común en mi hogar (Nguyet Ha, mamá de Đào Quang Lâm, de 5 años)
 

Preparing great primary school teachers is not so elementary

Betsy Brown Ruzzi's picture
Also available in: Español and Français
High-performing systems set rigorous standards for becoming a teacher in order to ensure that only the most qualified individuals enter classrooms

 
Ed's note: This guest blog is by Betsy Brown Ruzzi of the National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE).

Developing teachers with a deep understanding of the content they teach underpins the success of primary schools in top-performing education systems.  This is one of the key findings in a new report recently released by the National Center on Education and the Economy’s Center on International Education Benchmarking, Not So Elementary: Primary School Teacher Quality in Top-Performing Systems.

Wasted years: Why do Indonesian children end up learning less?

Samer Al-Samarrai's picture

Now that the dust has settled around the PISA results we have been thinking about the reasons behind Indonesia's poor showing. For those of you who haven't seen them, Indonesia ranked lower than all participating countries except Peru in mathematics and science, and was fifth from last on reading. Perhaps more worrying were the low absolute levels of learning reported for 15-year-olds. In mathematics, three-quarters of students were rated at or below the lowest benchmark – a level associated with only rudimentary levels of proficiency and a lack of higher order thinking skills.

How teachers are helping rebuild education in Timor-Leste

Joao dos Santos's picture
More than 30 leaders of faith-based organizations expressed support for ending extreme poverty by 2030.


The World Bank Group and faith-based organizations share something in common – fighting poverty. Now, they’re joining forces to do it. More than 30 leaders representing Bahai, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, and Sikh organizations formally expressed support for ending extreme poverty by 2030 – a goal backed by the World Bank Group’s 188 member countries.

Their joint statement, “Ending Extreme Poverty: A Moral and Spiritual Imperative,” released April 9, called for an end to the “scandal of extreme poverty” and said they would use their “voices to compel and challenge others to join us in this urgent cause inspired by our deepest spiritual values.” They added they would commit to hold “all levels of leadership accountable – public and private, domestic and international.”

Learning under the trees in Ongiva

Cristina Santos's picture

SAO PAULO, June 4, 2011 -- For the cities of the world, there’s rarely if ever been such a momentous single week.  Faced with the potentially catastrophic impacts of climate change, the C40 organization of world’s large cities met in this Brazilian megacity to announce a set of landmark agreements. All the accords, said New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg, current C40 chairman and the prime driver of its new initiatives, will be designed to undergird their struggle against rising seas and disruptive weather patterns -- in a world in which cities are responsible, directly or indirectly, for up to 80 percent of global climate emissions.

WB C40 agreement“The leaders of C40 Cities - the world’s megacities - hold the future in their hands,” Bloomberg asserted.

As a first step, the three dozen C40 mayors confirmed a full merger with the Clinton Climate Initiative, assuring added funding for a centralized, high-grade professional staff as well as full-bore support from former President Bill Clinton, who flew to São Paulo to seal and celebrate the agreement. Staff operations are global, with current bases in London and New York.